Programme

This page provides details of featured presentations, the conference schedule and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.



Conference Outline

Thursday, May 23, 2024Friday, May 24, 2024Saturday, May 25, 2024Sunday, May 26, 2024Monday, May 27, 2024

Location: Tokyo Garden Terrace Kioicho Conference Center, Tokyo

11:30-12:30: Conference Check-in | Main Room (4F)

12:30-12:35: Announcements | Main Room (4F) & Online

12:35-13:00: Welcome Addresses & Recognition of IAFOR Scholarship Winners | Main Room (4F) & Online
Joseph Haldane, IAFOR, Japan

13:00-14:30: Panel Presentation | Main Room (4F) & Online
The Work of the University in Perilous Times
Donald E. Hall, Binghamton University, United States
Can Today’s Universities Contribute to a Better Future?
Umberto Ansaldo, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Moderated Q & A Session

14:30-14:50: Coffee Break

14:50-15:15: Keynote Presentation | Main Room (4F) & Online
Navigating Polarising Discourses: Cultivating Values-based Literacies in a Multimodal Society
Johan Edelheim, Hokkaido University, Japan

15:15-15:40: Q & A Session | Main Room (4F) & Online

15:45-16:10: Keynote Presentation | Main Room (4F) & Online
Satellite Constellations and National Communities
Thor Kerr, Curtin University, Australia

16:10-16:25: Q & A Session | Main Room (4F) & Online

16:25-16:40: Conference Photograph

17:30-19:30: Welcome Reception | The Public Red Akasaka
This is a free event open to all registered delegates

Location: Toshi Center Hotel, Tokyo

09:15-09:45: Conference Check-in | Subaru Room (5F)

09:45-10:45: Panel Presentation | Orion Hall (5F) & Online
Ethics and Care in Sole Custody Policy
Grant Black, Chuo University, Japan
Ayako Harada, Nagoya University, Japan
Timothy Langley, Langley Esquire, Japan
Noriko Odagiri, Tokyo International University, Japan
Rokuro Tabuchi, Sophia University, Japan

10:45-11:00: Coffee Break

11:00-12:30: The Forum | Orion Hall (5F)
Discussions on Global Citizenship

12:30-14:00: Lunch Break

14:00-15:00: Haiku Workshop | Orion Hall (5F)
Hana Fujimoto, Haiku International Association, Japan
Emiko Miyashita, Haiku International Association, Japan

15:00-15:30: Extended Coffee Break | Subaru (5F)

15:30-16:30: Conference Poster Session | Orion Hall (5F)

19:00-21:00: Conference Dinner | Shunju Tameikesanno
This is a ticketed event

Location: Toshi Center Hotel, Tokyo

08:30-09:30: Conference Check-in (7F)

09:30-11:10: Onsite Parallel Session 1
Room 603: Politics and Social History
Room 604: Psychology and Social Psychology
Room 605: Psychology in Education
Room 607: Economics and Management
Room 608: Language, Linguistics
Room 701: Cultural Studies
Room 703: Teaching and Learning
Room 704: Spatial and Public Arts
Room 705: Architecture, Culture and Politics
Room 707: Cultural Studies
Room 708: Globalisation in Arts and Social Sciences (Workshops)

11:10-11:25: Coffee Break

11:25-12:40: Onsite Parallel Session 2
Room 603: Global Citizenship
Room 604: Community Development
Room 605: Leadership in Education
Room 607: Politics and Economic Management
Room 608: Language, Linguistics
Room 701: Sexuality and Gender in the Arts
Room 703: Other Humanities
Room 704: Music and Arts
Room 705: Architecture and Urban Design Studies/Design
Room 707: Buddhism Literature
Room 708: Teaching and Learning the Arts (Panel)

12:40-12:55: Coffee Break

12:55-14:35: Onsite Parallel Session 3
Room 603: Health and Public Policy
Room 604: Immigration, Refugees, Race, Nation
Room 605: AI and Media
Room 607: AI in Economics and Management
Room 608: Literature/Literary Studies
Room 701: Difference
Room 703: Teaching and Learning in the Arts
Room 704: Media, Film Studies, Theatre, Communication
Room 705: Media and Society
Room 707: Cultural and National Identities
Room 708: Science, Environment and the Humanities (Workshop)

14:35-14:50: Coffee Break

14:50-16:30: Onsite Parallel Session 4
Room 603: Urban Development and Sustainability
Room 604: Immigration, Refugees, Race, Nation
Room 605: Digital Literacy in Education
Room 607: Economic Management
Room 608: Literature/Literary Studies
Room 701: First Nations and Indigenous Peoples
Room 703: Teaching and Learning
Room 704: Media, Film Studies, Theatre, Communication
Room 705: Media and Journalism
Room 707: Cultural Values
Room 708: Media and Film Studies (Panel)

16:30-16:45: Coffee Break

16:45-18:25: Onsite Parallel Session 5
Room 603: Ethnicity and Identity
Room 604: International Relations and Human Rights
Room 605: Research Methodologies, Quantitative and Qualitative
Room 607: Economic Management
Room 608: Literature/Literary Studies
Room 701: Religion, Spirituality
Room 703: Teaching and Learning
Room 704: Aesthetics and Design
Room 705: No Session
Room 707: Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies
Room 708: No Session

18:25-19:25: Cultural Event | Room 701 (7F)
Kimono Workshop
This is a free event open to all registered delegates.

Location: Toshi Center Hotel, Tokyo

08:30-09:30: Conference Check-in (7F)

09:30-11:10: Onsite Parallel Session 1
Room 603: Peace and Conflicts
Room 604: Teaching and Learning
Room 605: Comparative Sociology
Room 607: Teaching and Learning Experiences
Room 608: Science, Environment and the Humanities
Room 701: Performing Arts Practices
Room 703: Teaching and Learning the Arts
Room 704: Higher Education in Cultural Studies
Room 705: Comparative Cultural Studies
Room 707: History/Historiography

11:10-11:25: Coffee Break

11:25-12:40: Onsite Parallel Session 2
Room 603: Cultural Demography
Room 604: Virtual Reality in Social Sciences
Room 605: Psychology and Social Psychology
Room 607: Education and Teacher Development
Room 608: Science, Environment and the Humanities
Room 701: Media Arts Practices
Room 703: Education and Pedagogy
Room 704: Culture, Education and Pedagogy
Room 705: Gender in Literature
Room 707: Media, Film Studies, Theatre, Communication

12:40-12:55: Coffee Break

12:55-14:35: Onsite Parallel Session 3
Room 603: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Gender
Room 604: Technology in Teaching and Learning
Room 605: Mental Health and Psychology in Education
Room 607: Comparative Studies on Health
Room 608: Environment and Immigration
Room 701: Aging and Arts
Room 703: Comparative Education
Room 704: Literary and Media Studies
Room 705: Culture in Politics & Politics in Culture
Room 707: Media Arts Practices

14:35-14:50: Coffee Break

14:50-16:30: Onsite Parallel Session 4
Room 603: Arts Theory and Criticism
Room 604: Teacher's Capacity Development
Room 605: Psychology and Social Psychology
Room 607: Education and Modern Skills
Room 608: Sustainability
Room 701: Food and Culture
Room 703: Teaching and Learning
Room 704: Culture in Language Education
Room 705: Gender Studies and Feminism
Room 707: Interdisciplinary Arts and Humanities

16:35-16:50: Onsite Closing Session | Room 701 (7F)

Location: Online via Zoom

08:55-09:00: Message from IAFOR

09:00-09:40: Keynote Presentation | Online
Possibilities of Change: Surviving the Times of Conflict
Ishmeet Kaur Chaudhry, Central University of Gujarat, India

09:40-11:20: Online Parallel Session 1
Room A (Live-Stream): Teaching and Learning Experiences
Room B (Live-Stream): Comparative Gender Studies
Room C (Live-Stream): Special Topics and Concerns in the Community
Room D (Live-Stream): Comparative Literature Studies

11:20-11:30: Break

11:30-13:10: Online Parallel Session 2
Room A (Live-Stream): Education and Social Welfare
Room B (Live-Stream): Social, Political and Community Agendas in the Arts
Room C (Live-Stream): Literature/Literary Studies
Room D (Live-Stream): Immigration, Refugee, Race, Nation

13:10-13:20: Break

13:20-15:00: Online Parallel Session 3
Room A (Live-Stream): Cultural Studies
Room B (Live-Stream): Political Science
Room C (Live-Stream): Teaching and Learning
Room D (Live-Stream): Ethnicity and Identity

15:00-15:10: Break

15:10-16:50: Online Parallel Session 4
Room A (Live-Stream): Cultural Studies
Room B (Live-Stream): Environment and the Humanities
Room C (Live-Stream): Interdisciplinary in the Arts
Room D (Live-Stream): Subculture Politics

16:50-17:00: Closing Message from IAFOR

The above schedule may be subject to change.


Featured Presentations

  • The Work of the University in Perilous Times
    The Work of the University in Perilous Times
    Keynote Presentation: Donald E. Hall
  • Can Today’s Universities Contribute to a Better Future?
    Can Today’s Universities Contribute to a Better Future?
    Keynote Presentation: Umberto Ansaldo
  • Navigating Polarising Discourses: Cultivating Values-Based Literacies in a Multimodal Society
    Navigating Polarising Discourses: Cultivating Values-Based Literacies in a Multimodal Society
    Keynote Presentation: Johan Edelheim
  • Satellite Constellations and National Communities
    Satellite Constellations and National Communities
    Keynote Presentation: Thor Kerr
  • Ethics and Care in Sole Custody Policy
    Ethics and Care in Sole Custody Policy
    Panel Presentation: Grant Black
  • What is Haiku?
    What is Haiku?
    Haiku Workshop: Hana Fujimoto, Emiko Miyashita
  • Possibilities of Change: Surviving the Times of Conflict
    Possibilities of Change: Surviving the Times of Conflict
    Keynote Presentation: Ishmeet Kaur

Final Programme

The online version of the Conference Programme is now available to view below via the Issuu viewing platform. Alternatively, download a PDF version. The Conference Programme can also be viewed on the Issuu website (requires a web browser). An Issuu app is available for Android users.

The Conference Programme contains access information, session information and a detailed day-to-day presentation schedule.


Important Information Emails

All registered attendees will receive an Important Information email and updates in the run-up to the conference. Please check your email inbox for something from "iafor.org". If you can not find these emails in your normal inbox, it is worth checking in your spam or junk mail folders as many programs filter out emails this way. If these did end up in one of these folders, please add the address to your acceptable senders' folder by whatever method your email program can do this.


Pre-Recorded Virtual Presentations & Virtual Poster Presentations

A number of presenters have submitted pre-recorded virtual video presentations or virtual poster presentations. We encourage you to view these presentations and provide feedback through the comments.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ACAH conferences via the links below.

The Work of the University in Perilous Times
Keynote Presentation: Donald E. Hall

As wars rage across the globe and as narcissistic politicians stoke mistrust in institutions—fanning the flames of racism and anti-intellectualism—the university campus has become a battleground over questions of social justice and fact-based understandings of history and the roots of inequality. Japanese, American, and European institutions have certainly seen past instances of such violent clashes over the very purpose of higher education, but today we find political interest groups using both mass and social media to incite conflict in new and shocking ways. We who work at universities are on the front lines—whether as students, professors, staff members, or administrators. We must be prepared to act bravely, but also tactically, as guardians of historical truth, as defenders of science, and as advocates for the needs of those groups and individuals easily scapegoated.

This is not a call to martyrdom. However, if we are not clever and subversive, we will lose the very positionality that enables our work and effectiveness.

In this address which will reference (among others) works by Michel de Certeau and Michel Foucault, both of whom were embroiled in the radical politics that shook late 1960s French higher education, I will argue for the use of multivalent tactics that are radical in intent but also self-protective in nature.

In drawing on examples from an international array of academic institutions, as well as works of fiction, film, and theory, I will ask conference members to take the work of IAFOR—its advocacy for international, intercultural, and interdisciplinary understanding—back to their home campuses. Indeed, the empathy, self-awareness, and commitment to understanding that we learn to exercise at IAFOR conferences represent critical skill sets that we must draw on as we wrestle with and respond to the growing volatility of our academic lives.

Read presenter's biography
Can Today’s Universities Contribute to a Better Future?
Keynote Presentation: Umberto Ansaldo

Since their inception, universities have set themselves goals typically captured in mottos and mission statements. Some of these goals obviously pertain to learning and wisdom; more ambitious ones mention truth, light, and progress, which are assumed to be the result of knowledge. More recently, especially in corporate universities, phrases like ‘change for good’ or ‘better future’ appear frequently, tacking on the theme of universities as agents of progress. Are these merely advertising catchphrases to increase student revenue, or can the modern university really bring about such positive societal developments?

In this presentation, before discussing whether and how today’s universities might contribute to positive change, I will offer some considerations about what a better future might look like. I will then look at different types of university systems and consider which might be better poised to bring about positive contributions to future society, and how they could strengthen their ability to do so. Finally, I will consider those structural aspects of modern universities that are clearly constraining the potential to build better futures.

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Navigating Polarising Discourses: Cultivating Values-Based Literacies in a Multimodal Society
Keynote Presentation: Johan Edelheim

In modern society, literacy extends beyond mere reading and writing skills to encompass the ability to navigate the diverse modes through which meanings are constructed. Therefore, a literate person is, by definition, somebody who interprets and designs meaning-making entities in a competent manner. Fostering multiliteracies is vital for cultivating critical literacy in a world where ‘texts’ found throughout society and on various media platforms shape our perceptions.

Addressing social conflicts and polarising views requires a nuanced approach rooted in the ethics of care and dialogue, emphasising empathy, and cultivating respectful communication. By scrutinising the axiological dimensions of media messages and recognising the influence of diverse societal values, we gain insight into the underlying dynamics of social discourse. This presentation underscores the interconnectedness of these ideas and stresses the importance of cultivating an ethical and critical framework for engaging with diverse perspectives in our interconnected, "glocal" society.

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Satellite Constellations and National Communities
Keynote Presentation: Thor Kerr

The launch of low-earth-orbit (LEO) satellite constellations providing broadband internet direct to subscribers has been met with varied responses by national regulatory authorities. On one hand, LEO satellite constellations may be revolutionising the telecommunications industry, particularly for high seas communication, but there has been noticeable hesitancy towards—or outright rejection of—the first available constellation by authorities in many national spaces.

In this presentation, I review a research project in collaboration with Dr Irfan Wahyudi at Universitas Airlangga in Surabaya, Indonesia, in which we are investigating discourses and practices around the adoption of Starlink services in Australia and Indonesia. For this study, we consider the long history of electronic communications and public memories around communications infrastructure. As we grapple with the emerging implications of our research, I will glance back to the final lecture of Benedict Anderson at Universitas Indonesia to consider imaginations about electronic communications and political communities.

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Ethics and Care in Sole Custody Policy
Panel Presentation: Grant Black

Japan has had a long legal tradition of awarding only sole custody in the event of the dissolution of a marriage: this is deeply rooted in the traditional koseki family registry system. Koseki means “membership of a household” and is oriented towards the household as a group rather than to individual status. Therefore, in the koseki system, a child must be attached to one household or the other in the case of divorce, and this remains the current policy in Japan today.

With custody granted to only one parent (almost always the holding parent and usually the mother), there is an epidemic of children growing up without the financial and emotional involvement of the non-custodial parent (usually the father). In Japan, 90% of divorcing women assume sole custody, with 70% of non-custodial parents having no contact with their children post-divorce. This complex legal territory is further complicated by issues involving protections from domestic violence and child abduction. Yet, rather than providing an ethical basis for the care and protection of women and the rights of children, it is widely observed—especially from an international perspective—that the current legal framework ends up incentivising child abduction as a strategy to obtain custodianship.

The koseki-driven custodial system further exacerbates an underreported crisis in Japan for single-parent homes and parental estrangement from children. It is estimated that as many as 1 in 6 children live in poverty in Japan, with the majority of those being in single parent homes. Furthermore, 3 million children in Japan are estranged from a parent and blocked from access to that parent.

With domestic and international efforts underway to reform Japan’s sole custody policy, this panel seeks to assess the ethics and care of the current legal landscape and will consider such issues as single-parent homes, child welfare, domestic violence protection, the role of the father, and the rights of the child to be raised by both parents in the case of separation.

Read presenters' biographies
What is Haiku?
Haiku Workshop: Hana Fujimoto, Emiko Miyashita

Friday, May 24, 2024 | 14:00-15:00
Toshi Center Hotel – Orion Hall (5F) & Online


Haiku is a style of poetry that enlightens and opens readers and writers to new perspectives, renowned for both its simplicity and complexity. As an art form, it has rapidly evolved from structured Japanese short-verse to an international phenomena that has hybridised via the infusion of many languages and literary techniques. Haiku has been adopted by many well-known poets, including Taneda Santoka, Basho Matsuo, Masaoka Shiki, Jack Kerouac, Marlene Mountain, and more.

In this workshop, renowned haiku instructors Hana Fujimoto and Emiko Miyashita will explain some of the basic differences between traditional Japanese and foreign-language approaches to the art form. They will also discuss how to evaluate haiku for its technical mastery and its emotional impact.

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Possibilities of Change: Surviving the Times of Conflict
Keynote Presentation: Ishmeet Kaur

In the last five years, the world has bore witness to various forms of conflict based on religious discrimination and/or patriarchal oppression; riots spurned by ethnic conflict and global political upheavals, the recent bio-war (COVID-19), and of course, the physical wars between Ukraine and Russia, the seizing of Afghanistan, and now the Gaza-Israel war; several grassroots farmers’ movements, and natural famines, floods, earthquakes, massive bushfires and landslides have erupted across the globe as a result of ongoing global warming. Is it even possible to reason why conflict has escalated to such a massive scale in such a short amount of time? Or, has this been a pattern across many years–that every eighty to hundred years, the order of the world undergoes a change where conflict erupts as a natural occurrence within the cycle of humanity?

We don’t have answers, we only have questions.

But in the bid to confront these questions head-on, we all look forward to a more peaceful future, hoping more peaceful years replace the years of turmoil. Twenty years ago, scholars had predicted that in 2050–only twenty five years from now–the world would be a more peaceful place (Håvard Hegre, 2012). In 2015, Time magazine sought out answers to questions such as ‘Is World Peace Possible?’. This presentation will delve into the many aforementioned conflicts waging across the globe at present and discuss the possibilities of change from both intercultural and literary perspectives. The presentation will offer an analytical study of the modes of representation used in selected protests or even writings by those living in the conflict zones. The presentation will also engage with the fact that digital spaces offer liminal spaces for dialogue on a global level, as it effectively leads to a blurring of divisive boundaries. Ultimately, the aim of this presentation is to offer reassuring prospects that enable humankind to be more prepared to tackle conflict in an unpredictable future.

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