ACAH2020 Overview


ACAH2020 | May 25-27, 2020

Held in partnership with the IAFOR Research Centre at the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, this international conference encourages academics and scholars to meet and exchange ideas and views in a forum stimulating respectful dialogue. This event will afford an exceptional opportunity for renewing old acquaintances, making new contacts, networking, and facilitating partnerships across national and disciplinary borders.

Since its founding in 2009, IAFOR has brought people and ideas together in a variety of events and platforms to promote and celebrate interdisciplinary study, and underline its importance. Over the past year we have engaged in many cross-sectoral projects, including those with universities (the University of Barcelona, Hofstra University, UCL, University of Belgrade and Moscow State University), a think tank (the East-West Center), as well as collaborative projects with the United Nations in New York, and here, with the Government of Japan through the Prime Minister’s office.

With the IAFOR Research Centre, we have engaged in a number of interdisciplinary initiatives we believe will have an important impact on domestic and international public policy conversations. It is through conferences like these that we expand our network and partners, and we have no doubt that ACAH2020 will offer a remarkable opportunity for the sharing of research and best practice, and for the meeting of people and ideas.

The 11th Asian Conference on Arts & Humanities (ACAH2020) is a multidisciplinary conference held concurrently with The 11th Asian Conference on the Social Sciences (ACSS2020). Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds.

Due to the global coronavirus pandemic, ACAH2020 was held Online via Zoom.

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Plenary Presentations

Keynote Presentation
Embracing Difference by Design: Virtues and Vices
Bruce Brown, Royal College of Art, United Kingdom

Keynote Presentation
Embracing the Power of Difference as an Elementary Idea
Chris Dalton, University of Reading, United Kingdom


Keynote Presentation
Numeratives in Japanese: How speakers perceive things when they count
Asako Iida, Chuo University, Tokyo

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Speakers

  • Bruce Brown
    Bruce Brown
    Royal College of Art, UK
  • Chris Dalton
    Chris Dalton
    University of Reading, UK
  • Asako Iida
    Asako Iida
    Chuo University, Japan

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Programme

  • Embracing Difference by Design: Virtues and Vices
    Embracing Difference by Design: Virtues and Vices
    Keynote Presentation: Bruce Brown
  • Embracing the Power of Difference as an Elementary Idea
    Embracing the Power of Difference as an Elementary Idea
    Keynote Presentation: Chris Dalton
  • Numeratives in Japanese: How speakers perceive things when they count
    Numeratives in Japanese: How speakers perceive things when they count
    Keynote Presentation: Asako Iida

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Organising Committee

The Organising Committee of The 12th Asian Conference on Arts & Humanities (ACAH) is composed of distinguished academics who are experts in their fields. Organising Committee members may also be members of IAFOR's International Academic Advisory Board. The Organising Committee is responsible for nominating and vetting Keynote and Featured Speakers; developing the conference programme, including special workshops, panels, targeted sessions, and so forth; event outreach and promotion; recommending and attracting future Organising Committee members; working with IAFOR to select PhD students and early career academics for IAFOR-funded grants and scholarships; and overseeing the reviewing of abstracts submitted to the conference.

  • Grant Black
    Grant Black
    Black Inc. Consulting, Japan
  • Clementina Cardoso
    Clementina Cardoso
    CIHRC Research and Development
  • Joseph Haldane
    Joseph Haldane
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
  • Donald E. Hall
    Donald E. Hall
    University of Rochester, USA
  • Bradley J. Hamm
    Bradley J. Hamm
    Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University, USA
  • Fan Li
    Fan Li
    LePing Social Entrepreneur Foundation & Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR), China
  • James W. McNally
    James W. McNally
    University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
  • Haruko Satoh
    Haruko Satoh
    Osaka University, Japan
  • Sela V. Panapasa
    Sela V. Panapasa
    University of Michigan, USA

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2020 Review Committee

  • Dr Mohd Syuhaidi Abu Bakar, Universiti Teknologi Mara, Malaysia
  • Dr Zahra Al-Zadjali, Sultan Qaboos University, Oman
  • Dr Lorna Dimatatac, Technological Institute of the Philippines, Philippines
  • Professor Ching-Jung Fang, Ming Chuan University, Taiwan
  • Professor Yi-Ting Kuo, Jen-Teh Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and Management, Taiwan
  • Dr Priscilla Peichin Lin, Fongshan Elementary School, Taiwan
  • Dr Reena Mittal, MJPRU, Bareilly, India
  • Dr Farida Panhwar, University of Sindh, Jamshoro, Pakistan
  • Dr Sarbjit Singh Pawar, Institute of Engineering and Technology, India
  • Dr Yi-Chin Shih, Tamkang University, Taiwan
  • Dr Mario Slugan, Ghent University, Belgium
  • Professor Joseph Sorensen, University of California at Davis, United States
  • Dr Suranti Trisnawati, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia
  • Professor Anne-Kathrin Wielgosz, Walsh University, United States
  • Dr Mathew Wong, Education University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  • Dr Min-Chia Young, Shu-Te University, Taiwan
  • Dr Shu-Yin Yu, Ming-Chuan University, Taiwan

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Bruce Brown
Royal College of Art, UK

Biography

Bruce Brown was educated at the Royal College of Art in London where he is currently Visiting Professor. Until 2016, Bruce was Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research) and Professor of Design at the University of Brighton. For twenty years previously he was Dean of the university’s Faculty of Arts & Architecture. In 2018 Bruce was appointed by the University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong Specialist Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China to Chair the assessment panels for Visual Arts, Design, Creative Media in the Hong Kong Research Assessment Exercise 2020. Prior to this he was appointed by the UK Funding Councils to Chair Main Panel D in the 2014 UK Research Excellence Framework. Prior to this he chaired Main Panel O in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. Bruce served as a member of the Advisory Board of the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council and has advised international organisations including the Hong Kong Council for Academic Accreditation and the Qatar National Research Fund. Bruce chaired the Portuguese Government’s Fundação para a Ciência ea Tecnologia Research Grants Panel [Arts] and was one of four people invited by the Portuguese Government to conduct an international review entitled Reforming Arts and Culture Higher Education in Portugal. He has served as Trustee and Governor of organisations such as the Art’s Council for England’s South East Arts Board, the Ditchling Museum and Shenkar College of Design and Engineering, Tel Aviv. Bruce is an Editor of Design Issues Research Journal (MIT), an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Art and a Life Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

Keynote Presentation (2020) | Embracing Difference by Design: Virtues and Vices
Chris Dalton
University of Reading, UK

Biography

Chris is Associate Professor of Management Learning and Leadership at Henley Business School at the University of Reading in the UK.

A dynamic and creative tutor and facilitator, Chris joined Henley in November 2005 and until 2010 was the Programme Director for Henley Distance Learning MBA (Flexible Learning), a course with over 2,500 executives enrolled worldwide.

Chris has over 26 years of experience in management education and training. Before coming to Henley, he worked at the Central European University Business School (and its predecessor, the International Management Center) in Budapest, Hungary, where his posts included Director of their full-time and modular MBA program (part of the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, USA). Chris teaches on the Executive MBA and runs corporate workshops and seminars related to management development in many parts of the world, including South Africa, central Europe and the Middle East. A Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA), Chris holds a PhD in Management Learning and Leadership from Lancaster University, and an MBA from Henley. His research is focused on the use of Reflection in Personal Development in post-experience Management Education.

His first book, The Every Day MBA, was published at the beginning of 2015 and his second, Brilliant Business Strategy for Business, released in February 2016. A second edition of the MBA book, re-titled MBA Day by Day, was published in September 2019. Chris was visiting professor at Soka University in Japan 2018-19, where he was on a year-long sabbatical devoted to writing and research, and is also visiting Professor of Foundations of Management at Cotrugli Business School, Croatia. He is currently writing a book on leadership and personal development in management, to be published at the end of 2020.

Keynote Presentation (2020) | Embracing the Power of Difference as an Elementary Idea
Asako Iida
Chuo University, Japan

Biography

Dr Iida holds a PhD from the University of Tokyo and is a professor in the Faculty of Global Management at Chuo University, in Tokyo, Japan. She was a visiting scholar at UCLA from 2015 to 2017, and has been a director of Japan Naming Association since 2019.

Her area of specialisation is in the field of linguistics, focusing particularly on analysing how to count things in modern Japanese, known as “numeratives”. She is one of the pioneers in this field, well known as the author of Kazoekata-no-Jiten (The Dictionary of Counting Things) (Shogakukan, 2004), which has sold more than 110,000 copies worldwide.

Currently she is instructing students who specialise in advertising, and holds a seminar titled “How to Attract Consumers from a Linguistic Approach”. She is an active copywriter winning prestigious advertisement contests, such as The Senden-kaigi Award (2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019). She also was an active member of the “Tokyo Sky Tree” Name Review Committee. Her research regarding the techniques of writing copy is crystallised in the book ‘A, sore hoshī!’ To Omowa Seru Kōkoku Kopī no Kotoba Jiten (I want it! The Word Dictionary of Ad Copy) (Nikkei Business Publications, 2017).

Keynote Presentation (2020) | Numeratives in Japanese: How speakers perceive things when they count
Embracing Difference by Design: Virtues and Vices
Keynote Presentation: Bruce Brown

The emergence of design as a professional discipline in the 1950’s heralded a new age of consumption and individualism. In response to the traumas of two world wars, design brought the promise of new utopias and a stable world. Being tied to industrial mass production the design of this Modernist utopia was built on “problem-solving”, “form follows function”, “less is more” and a conviction that the evils of society could, and should, be eradicated. This 20th century view of a virtuous world was shattered by 21st century communications technologies. Here the tools of centralised authorities were replaced by social networks with their decentralised cacophonies of voices and avalanches of information. But, if an old world order has receded then a new kind of order still needs designing to meet these contemporary conditions and prevent societies from slipping back into anarchy, mob rule or tribalism. Indeed, we seem to have liberated ourselves from the industrialised tyrannies of one-over-many to inhabit a new extreme in which the many are starting to dominate the few and information overload works like anaesthetic. We seem to have oscillated from one polarity, “problem, solving” to its antithesis, “wicked problems” – ones that cannot be solved due to the complexity of their conditions.

This, in itself, forces binary options to be adopted so that paralysis is avoided and decisions made. If the existence of such polarities is to be managed then the multifarious differences of a messy world must be embraced and structured for a new order to emerge. As the relentless march of industrialisation forced people to migrate from countryside to city so did the word “virtue” assume a new meaning. Setting itself against the vices of inner city existence (prostitution and crime) virtue became associated with chastity and innocence (as we still know it today). But, its original meaning was different – virtue being the soundness of judgment to find points of equilibrium between opposing vices (e.g. between excess or deficiency, heaven or hell, sex or love, rich or poor, fast or slow). In other words, to embrace (not neutralise) difference as a key to finding new ways of making the world in which we want to live. This is the virtue of design in meeting our challenge.

Read presenter biographies.

Embracing the Power of Difference as an Elementary Idea
Keynote Presentation: Chris Dalton

This presentation is a response to the call of this conference to embrace difference.

Difference is more than simply a driver or inhibitor of creativity, it is the elementary source of all information. It defines us and is often how we define ourselves. In humans difference is embedded in the act of perception, yet we rarely stop to understand the nature of difference as an idea. This talk argues that difference is the basic building block of knowledge, but its properties are often overlooked, misunderstood or ignored.

Embracing Difference means understanding it, and this involves a shift in seeing. Social science, which here includes management learning and education, has struggled to reconcile varying perspectives between disciplines, between methodologies, and between individual researchers. “Difference” has generally become a synonym for “disagreement”. This will not do, as it does not address the complexity of issues we face or the multidisciplinary response required.

This presentation uses the context of post-experience management learning in a European Business School to illustrate some of the problems and pitfalls of difference, as well as the tremendous potential of an awareness of its true nature. It will propose three fundamental, universal properties of difference; zero-dimension, inter-connectivity and generativity. These form a conceptual framework for multidisciplinary researchers and practitioners to re-evaluate their perceptions and dialogue.

Read presenter biographies.

Numeratives in Japanese: How speakers perceive things when they count
Keynote Presentation: Asako Iida

Japanese language has morphemes which only appear next to a numeral when a speaker counts things. They are called josuushi or “numeratives”. Typical examples are -ko, -mai, -hon, and -dai. They also categorise the referent of a noun terms of its animacy, shape, size, function, and properties.

It is estimated that there are more than 500 numeratives in modern Japanese. This presentation is going to analyze what kind of cognitive activities are working when a native speaker picks an appropriate numerative out of the vast list of morphemes. For example, -hiki is a numerative used when we count creatures in general, such as insects, fish, reptiles, small mammals and even bacteria. Bigger mammals, such as elephants, horses, and whales are preferred to be counted with -tou, while we have collected several examples which allow the use of -tou to count beetles, butterflies, and small mammals. It proves that speakers see some common features between elephants and beetles when they count.

Another example is -hon considered to be used in counting long objects such as pens, strings, trees and roads. It is interesting that this numerative is also used to count shapeless entities such as homeruns, rehearsals, phone calls, pieces of email correspondence, TV programs, and Judo’s techniques.

In conclusion, we will show the cognitive frameworks which are filtering the morphological application of numeratives in Japanese, and consider the cultural backgrounds affecting them.

Read presenter biographies.

Grant Black
Black Inc. Consulting, Japan

Biography

Dr Grant Black is an associate professor in the Faculty of Commerce at Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan, where he has taught Global Skills and Global Issues since 2013. Grant is engaged in diverse roles as a global manager, systems builder, executive leader and university professor. His research and teaching areas include global management skills, intercultural intelligence (CQ) and organisational management. He also has taught Japanese Management Theory at J. F. Oberlin University (Japan), and a continuing education course in the Foundations of Japanese Zen Buddhism at Temple University Japan. Previously, he was Chair of the English Section at the Center for Education of Global Communication at the University of Tsukuba where he served in a six-year post in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. He holds a BA Highest Honors in Religious Studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara; an MA in Japanese Buddhist Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles; and a Doctor of Social Science (DSocSci) from the Department of Management in the School of Business at the University of Leicester. Dr Black is a Chartered Manager (CMgr), the highest status that can be achieved in the management profession in the UK. In 2018, he was elected a Fellow of the Chartered Management Institute (FCMI) and Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA). Grant is President of Black Inc. Consulting (Japan), a business & university global strategic management firm based in Tokyo which helps individuals and organisations achieve their global targets. He is the director of the newly formed Nippon Academic Management Institute (NAMI) and the author of the forthcoming “Education Reform Policy at a Japanese Super Global University: Policy Translation, Migration and Mutation” (Routledge, 2021). He serves as a Vice-President and Auditor for the International Academic Forum (IAFOR).

Dr Grant Black is a Vice-President (at large) of IAFOR and Auditor of the organisation. He is a member of the Business & Economics section of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Clementina Cardoso
CIHRC Research and Development

Biography

Clementina Cardoso is the Director of CIHRC Research and Development. Prior to this she was at the School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy of the University of London Birkbeck College where she taught courses on Local Government, Public Policy and Management.

Dr Cardoso completed her PhD at LSE and held positions at University College London Institute of Education where she researched, taught and advised MA and PhD students and coordinated training for overseas civil servants and researchers. She has also been a European Commission Research Fellow, LSE, an Associate Fellow at the University of Lisbon and an Honorary Fellow at the University of Bristol Faculty of Social Sciences and Law; and held Visiting positions at the Universities of Lisbon, Louvain and has been Guest Professor on the MA and PhD programmes of, amongst others, the University of S. Paulo, Brazil. She has also been a keynote speaker at the European Parliament and at conferences.

She works within the tradition of British Government and Policy Studies, across the Social Sciences disciplines and uses comparative methodologies.

As a grant holder, she produced research sponsored by the National Science, Research and Technology Council of Portugal and the European Commission on comparative central government policy and political and economic philosophies; comparative methodologies; market-oriented policies, funding and financial management; the involvement of commercial organisations in service provision and management and partnership governance. She has served on Editorial Boards of Academic Journals; lived in Portugal, the United States, England and Hong Kong; is fluent in English, Portuguese and French, reads and speaks Spanish and Italian, has beginners knowledge of Chinese and starters knowledge of Japanese.

Dr Cardoso has an interest in the History, Culture, Philosophy and the Arts of China and Japan.

Joseph Haldane
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan

Biography

Joseph Haldane is the Chairman and CEO of IAFOR. He is responsible for devising strategy, setting policies, forging institutional partnerships, implementing projects, and overseeing the organisation’s business and academic operations, including research, publications and events.

Dr Haldane holds a PhD from the University of London in 19th-century French Studies, and has had full-time faculty positions at the University of Paris XII Paris-Est Créteil (France), Sciences Po Paris (France), and Nagoya University of Commerce and Business (Japan), as well as visiting positions at the French Press Institute in the University of Paris II Panthéon-Assas (France), The School of Journalism at Sciences Po Paris (France), and the School of Journalism at Moscow State University (Russia).

Dr Haldane’s current research concentrates on post-war and contemporary politics and international affairs, and since 2015 he has been a Guest Professor at The Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, where he teaches on the postgraduate Global Governance Course, and Co-Director of the OSIPP-IAFOR Research Centre, an interdisciplinary think tank situated within Osaka University.

A Member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network for Global Governance, Dr Haldane is also a Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Philology at the University of Belgrade (Serbia), a Visiting Professor at the School of Business at Doshisha University (Japan), and a Member of the International Advisory Council of the Department of Educational Foundations at the College of Education of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (USA).

From 2012 to 2014, Dr Haldane served as Treasurer of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (Chubu Region) and he is currently a Trustee of the HOPE International Development Agency (Japan). He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society in 2012, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 2015.

Donald E. Hall
University of Rochester, USA

Biography

Donald E. Hall is Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering at the University of Rochester, USA. Prior to moving to Rochester, he was Dean of Arts and Sciences at Lehigh University, USA. Dean Hall has published widely in the fields of British Studies, Gender Theory, Cultural Studies, and Professional Studies. Over the course of his career, he served as Jackson Distinguished Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English (and previously Chair of the Department of Foreign Languages) at West Virginia University. Before that, he was Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English at California State University, Northridge, where he taught for 13 years. He is a recipient of the University Distinguished Teaching Award at CSUN, was a visiting professor at the National University of Rwanda, was Lansdowne Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the University of Victoria (Canada), was Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Cultural Studies at Karl Franzens University in Graz, Austria, and was Fulbright Specialist at the University of Helsinki. He has also taught in Sweden, Romania, Hungary, and China. He served on numerous panels and committees for the Modern Language Association (MLA), including the Task Force on Evaluating Scholarship for Tenure and Promotion, and the Convention Program Committee. In 2012, he served as national President of the Association of Departments of English. From 2013-2017, he served on the Executive Council of the MLA.

His current and forthcoming work examines issues such as professional responsibility and academic community-building, the dialogics of social change and activist intellectualism, and the Victorian (and our continuing) interest in the deployment of instrumental agency over our social, vocational, and sexual selves. Among his many books and editions are the influential faculty development guides, The Academic Self and The Academic Community, both published by Ohio State University Press. Subjectivities and Reading Sexualities: Hermeneutic Theory and the Future of Queer Studies were both published by Routledge Press. Most recently he and Annamarie Jagose, of the University of Auckland, co-edited a volume titled The Routledge Queer Studies Reader. Though he is a full-time administrator, he continues to lecture worldwide on the value of a liberal arts education and the need for nurturing global competencies in students and interdisciplinary dialogue in and beyond the classroom.

Professor Donald E. Hall is a Vice-President of IAFOR. He is Chair of the Arts, Humanities, Media & Culture division of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Bradley J. Hamm
Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University, USA

Biography

Bradley J. Hamm is a full professor at the Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications at Northwestern University, USA, serving as the dean from 2012 to 2018, where he oversaw Medill's programs in Chicago, Washington, DC, and San Francisco in addition to its home campus in Evanston. Previously, he was Dean of the Indiana University School of Journalism in Bloomington and Indianapolis, USA.

Hamm's PhD is in mass communication research from the University of North Carolina, USA. He received a master’s degree in journalism from the University of South Carolina, USA, and an undergraduate degree from Catawba College in North Carolina, USA.

He also served as the interim dean and associate dean of the School of Communications at Elon University in North Carolina, USA. Hamm has taught in study abroad programs in Japan, China and the United Kingdom and started his career as a newspaper reporter. His teaching and research interests are in journalism history and media theory, particularly agenda setting theory.

He served as a trustee for the Poynter Institute and is a judge for the Scripps Howard National Journalism Awards. He serves as an independent, non-executive member of the Board of Directors for Next Digital media company of Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Keynote Presentation (2019) | Reclaiming the Future in Tech, Media and Communities
Featured Presentation (2019) | IAFOR Documentary Photography Award & Panel
Fan Li
LePing Social Entrepreneur Foundation & Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR), China

Biography

Fan founded Global Links Initiative with Robin Rowland in 2003, a nonprofit organisation headquartered first in Tokyo and then in Shanghai that fostered practical links among social entrepreneurs around the world. In 2004, GLI first brought the concept of social entrepreneurship to China.

Fan was a founding member of the China-US Strategic Philanthropy Partnership (CUSP), a leading network that promotes research, exchange and collaboration between the philanthropic sectors of China and the United States, she worked with CUSP from 2010 to 2016. Fan connected and advised partnership building between two leading social enterprises in Japan and China from 2009 to 2012, which resulted in the first China-Japan social joint venture in sustainable farming.

Fan is co-editor-in-chief of the Chinese version of Stanford Social Innovation Review. She is also editor of the groundbreaking book, A New Horizon: 10 Stories of Social Entrepreneurs in China (HongKong, 2010). Her translation of Kazuyoshi Fujita’s book, Radish Revolution, was one of the best sellers of the SanLian Publishing House in 2013. She currently serves as International Advisor for the LePing Foundation in Beijing. Fan’s work as Senior Fellow at the IAFOR Research Centre leads efforts to grow the East Asia Social Innovation Initiative, a cutting-edge network for research, dialogue and knowledge sharing on social innovation in East Asia.

James W. McNally
University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging

Biography

Dr James W. McNally is the Director of the NACDA Program on Aging, a data archive containing over 1,500 studies related to health and the aging lifecourse. He currently does methodological research on the improvement and enhancement of secondary research data and has been cited as an expert authority on data imputation. Dr McNally has directed the NACDA Program on Aging since 1998 and has seen the archive significantly increase its holdings with a growing collection of seminal studies on the aging lifecourse, health, retirement and international aspects of aging. He has spent much of his career addressing methodological issues with a specific focus on specialized application of incomplete or deficient data and the enhancement of secondary data for research applications. Dr McNally has also worked extensively on issues related to international aging and changing perspectives on the role of family support in the later stages of the aging lifecourse.

Dr James W. McNally is a Vice-President of IAFOR. He is Chair of the Social Sciences & Sustainability division of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Haruko Satoh
Osaka University, Japan

Biography

Haruko Satoh is Specially Appointed Professor at the Graduate School of Engineering Science in charge of CAREN (Osaka University Centre for the Advancement of Research and Education Exchange Networks in Asia) and also lecturer at the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), where she ran the MEXT Reinventing Japan project on “Peace and Human Security in Asia (PAHSA)” with six Southeast Asian and four Japanese universities. She is also the President of the The Asian Political and International Studies Association (APISA).

In the past she has worked at the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA), Chatham House, and Gaiko Forum. Her interests are primarily in state theory, Japanese nationalism and identity politics. Recent publications include: “Rethinking Security in Japan: In Search of a Post-‘Postwar’ Narrative” in Jain & Lam (Eds), Japan’s Strategic Challenges in a Changing Regional Environment (World Scientific, 2012); “Through the Looking-glass: China’s Rise as Seen from Japan”, (co-authored with Toshiya Hoshino), Journal of Asian Public Policy, Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 181–198 (July 2012); “Post-3.11 Japan: A Matter of Restoring Trust?”, ISPI Analysis No. 83 (December 2011); “Legitimacy Deficit in Japan: The Road to True Popular Sovereignty” in Kane, Loy & Patapan (Eds), Political Legitimacy in Asia: New Leadership Challenges (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), “Japan: Re-engaging with China Meaningfully” in Tang, Li & Acharya (Eds), Living with China: Regional States and China through Crises and Turning Points, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Professor Haruko Satoh is a member of IAFOR’s Academic Governing Board. She is Chair of the Politics, Law & International Relations section of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Sela V. Panapasa
University of Michigan, USA

Biography

Dr Sela V. Panapasa studies family support and intergenerational exchanges among aged Pacific Islanders living in the US and Pacific region. Her work examines changes in elderly living arrangements and headship status in response to demographic and socioeconomic change. Her interests include family demography, race and ethnicity, measuring health disparities and comparative studies.